In Agreement Agreeance

“The results of my experience are consistent with Michelson`s and with the law of general relativity.” If you agree with me, I will make those changes. I`ve always used both; If we agree, we should sign the agreement. One shows that we feel that we agree and that we are in favour of ratification of this agreement. I didn`t use it much. Have agreement and approval always meant exactly the same thing? Because there is no feeling and carelessness, is there? Is it possible that history is littered with agreements that were not agreements? The point of the article is not to say “don`t use the abstract Noun chord.” English is blessed with an abundance of wealth, but if what you meant was approval and you used approval, because it sounded like what you wanted, but he knew nothing about the deal, it is something that English users need to be aware of. Interesting – I never heard the word consent, but I too would wonder if it still meant the same thing as the agreement (not that most users are aware of possible differences or would take care of it). We almost ended up with “okay,” and then some damn Redneck had to mix “agreement” and “acceptance” and we`re back where we started. It`s a very effective contribution and I`m very much in agreement with it. I do not think the agreement is a generally accepted word. That is not to say that it is not used in certain environments or regions, but I do not remember hearing or reading it, and it seems strange to me.

I would never use it myself. When you say “humans in my territory,” are you talking about a particular geographical area, profession or discipline? I`m curious about this group that uses the word. Using the agreement for an agreement is probably the linguistic equivalent of using a half-moon key instead of a combination key or a basic key. You can do it, but it still leaves a little bit of damage. If you want to use consent, end, whatever, but at least note that the old robust contract is in the toolbox. An agreement is an agreement, a compromise to get the two sides to find common ground. For things to be consistent, they are harmonious or not contradict each other.